Drupal 8

Authored By: randy On: Fri, 04/06/2018 - 15:48

As Drupal module maintainers, we at Nextide need to be constantly updating our modules to add new features or patch issues.  Whether your module is available for download or is a custom module for a client site, you can't expect users to uninstall and reinstall it to pick up new features.  If you have data or configuration changes, update hooks are mandatory to learn.  This post will show how we created a new content entity in a Drupal update hook.

Authored By: blaine On: Fri, 03/30/2018 - 12:15

The Maestro module and it's use-case can be challenging to understand and we recognized there was a need to provide a better explanation and examples.

It's fair to say that every company and organization from small to large has business processes involving the movement of forms and or documents with varying degrees of complexity and number of participating internal and external users. Maestro was developed to help automate these processes with it's workflow editor and workflow engine.

If it can be flow-charted, then it can be automated with Maestro.

Authored By: randy On: Wed, 11/01/2017 - 10:08

This is part 4 of the Maestro for Drupal 8 blog series, defining and documenting the various aspects of the Maestro workflow engine.  Please see Part 1 for information on Maestro's Templates and Tasks, Part 2 for the Maestro's workflow engine internals and Part 3 for information on how Maestro handles logical loopback scenarios.

Authored By: blaine On: Mon, 10/16/2017 - 21:00

This is part 3 of our series on developing a Decoupled Drupal Client Application with Ember. If you haven't yet read the previous articles, it would be best to review Part1 first. In this article, we are going to clean up the code to remove the hard coded URL for the host, move the login form to a separate page and add a basic header and styling.

Authored By: randy On: Thu, 09/28/2017 - 11:34

This is part 3 of the Maestro for Drupal 8 blog series, defining and documenting the various aspects of the Maestro workflow engine.  Please see Part 1 for information on Maestro's Templates and Tasks, and Part 2 for the Maestro's workflow engine internals.  This post will help workflow administrators understand why Maestro for Drupal 8's validation engine warns about the potential for loopback conditions known as "Regeneration".

Authored By: randy On: Wed, 09/06/2017 - 09:54

The Maestro Engine is the mechanism responsible for executing a workflow template by assigning tasks to actors, executing tasks for the engine and providing all of the other logic and glue functionality to run a workflow.  The maestro module is the core module in the Maestro ecosystem and is the module that houses the template, variable, assignment, queue and process schema.  The maestro module also provides the Maestro API for which developers can interact with the engine to do things such as setting/getting process variables, start processes, move the queue along among many other things.

Authored By: blaine On: Fri, 09/01/2017 - 15:00

This is part 2 of our series on developing a Decoupled Drupal Client Application with Ember. If you haven't yet read Part 1, it would be best to review Part1 first, as this article continues on with adding authentication and login form to our application. Shortly, we will explore how to create a new article but for that we will need to have authentication working so that we can pass in our credentials when posting our new article.

Authored By: randy On: Mon, 08/14/2017 - 11:07

Templates and tasks make up the basic building blocks of a Maestro workflow.  Maestro requires a workflow template to be created by an administrator.  When called upon to do so, Maestro will put the template into "production" and will follow the logic in the template until completion.  The definitions of in-production and template are important as they are the defining points for important jargon in Maestro.  Simply put, templates are the workflow patterns that define logic, flow and variables.  Processes are templates that are being executed which then have process variables and assigned t

Authored By: blaine On: Tue, 08/08/2017 - 10:51

This is the first in a series of articles that will document lessons learned while exploring using Ember as a decoupled client with Drupal.

You will need to have Ember CLI installed and a local Drupal 8 (local development assumed). This initial series of articles is based on Ember 2.14 and Drupal 8.3.5 but my initial development was over 6 months ago with earlier versions of both Ember so this should work if you have an earlier ember 2.11 or so installed.

Authored By: randy On: Tue, 08/01/2017 - 09:13

We've put together a Maestro overview video introducing you to Maestro for Drupal 8.  Maestro is a workflow engine that allows you to create and automate a sequence of tasks representing any business process. Our business workflow engine has existed in various forms since 2003 and through many years of refinements, it was released for Drupal 7 in 2010. 

If it can be flow-charted, then it can be automated